Author: TTS Staffing Blog

Time Management for Recruiters

Our topic of the week in our meeting last week was “Time Management”. I found some helpful tools to help guide us through being successful in this process that a lot of people find hard to get a handle of. Everyone is capable of doing this – it’s just getting your priorities organized and setting goals for yourself. 

Utilize Systems That Work For You 
This could be something as simple as a to-do list or using sticky notes. After you create a list with your daily tasks, determine what tasks are going to have the quickest impact for generating revenue. Those should be the first tasks you complete. Chances are you have one or more calendaring systems and other applications for productivity. Take advantage of them. Productivity tools are there to help you.

For example, use your CRM system to document notes from all sales and recruiting calls, meetings and interviews. Be sure to use the built-in calendaring system to schedule your follow-up tasks. Every client and candidate interaction should have an action item associated with it. Scheduling the follow-up task (action item) is critical. By doing this your CRM system will create a list of tasks such as phone calls or emails that you have to complete every day.

Are You a Morning Person or a Night Owl?
Figure out what time of day you produce your best work product. Schedule your most challenging tasks during this time.  For example, if you have a big presentation coming up for a prospect and you do your best work in the early morning, schedule it in the morning. Don’t schedule it for late afternoon when you’re tired. Furthermore, prepare for that presentation in the early morning.

For recruiters, you should build time into your weekly schedule to call candidates at night between 6:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. The best candidates are not able to talk at work. Contact them after hours. For sales professionals, decision makers often can often only be reached between 7:00 a.m. and 8:30 am and between 5:00 pm and 7:00 p.m,  They’re in meetings the rest of the day. Do your pre-call planning and research around these times. Plan to start your day early and work late. 

Measure Results, Not Activity
It’s really easy to fall into the trap of keeping and feeling busy but producing nothing. I see this happen all the time.  Don’t confuse activity with results. Measure your results or outcomes, not your activity. For example, the most common measurement in our industry is number of phone calls for both sales and recruiting. At the end of the day it’s really about how many new hiring managers (or candidates) you qualify and add to your CRM system or job orders you uncover. So measure that, not the number of phone calls.

Create a “Stop Doing” List  
In his book, Good To Great. Jim Collins suggests that those who build good-to-great companies made as much use of “stop doing” lists as they did “to do” lists. Most people live busy but undisciplined lives. We have ever-expanding to-do lists where we try to do more and more but it rarely works. If it doesn’t help grow your business, stop doing it. Try to adopt the self discipline of unplugging yourself from your “busy work.”

Staffing professionals often place a higher priority on completing their “to-do’s” (candidate applications and other related paperwork, entering candidate and client data into their database and responding to email) over revenue generating tasks, such as making sales calls, cold calling or visiting clients. All of these tasks need to be completed but if the revenue generating tasks never take priority your book of business will never grow. Reacting to every client request and email “on the spot” is often the biggest reason why staffing professionals fail to achieve their daily goals. The next time you have a “client emergency,” take five minutes and really think through how quickly you need to respond and resolve the issue.

Death By Meeting 
Put an end to “on the fly” meetings. I’m talking about the ones where someone stops by your office or cube and asks if you have a minute. You don’t want to be rude so you go along with it.  From now on, when people come to your office or cube, askthem, “What do you think is the best solution to the issue?” People typically know the answer and simply need validation from their peer or manager. This is an easy way to prevent a two-minute conversation from turning into a thirty-minute discussion. 

Do a weekly meeting where you can discuss all of the issues.  Just make sure that all of the decision makers are in the room and there is a clear purpose to the meeting with actionable items.  

Email Management
Let’s face it — we are dependent on email for communication. Unfortunately that means email is a killer when it comes to time management. When you are doing important tasks….i.e., those on your to-do list, turn off your email. Set up an auto responder to let people know you will call them back later. If  you don’t do this, I guarantee your email will always interrupt you.  The big question is, do you have the self discipline to ‘turn off’ your email? Try it!

To-Do Lists and your 2010 Goals
Most people use lists as a way to manage themselves and the tasks they need to complete.  It’s easy to let the list get to 10+ items. When that happens we end up focusing on the wrong tasks. Keep the list to five items. The items on your daily to-do list should tie back into your annual goals for 2014. Whatever your personal goals are for the year, your list should be linked to those goals. Be consistent with the tasks you need to do top accomplish your tactical sales plan.

Plan for the Unexpected
One thing we know for sure about working in the staffing industry — circumstances can change on a moment’s notice. Always build time into your daily plan for the unexpected. By planning for this each day you will avoid feeling reactive. There are always times of the year (or quarter) when the unexpected is more likely to fill your time than others. Plan accordingly.

Establishing Your Priority List:

Ask yourself: “What is it that you and only you can do?” This is your priority list. Delegate everything else.

Ask yourself: “Am I doing what I do best and getting the best return for the company?”

Remember the Pareto Principle: states that, for many events, roughly 80% of the effects come from 20% of the causes.

Time: 20% of our time produces 80% of our results

Counseling: 20% of the people take up 80% of our time

Services: 20% of the services bring in 80% of the profit

Reading: 20% of the book contains 80% of the content

Job: 20% of our work gives us 80% of our satisfaction

Donations: 20% of the people will give 80% of the money

Leadership: 20% of the people will make 80% of the decisions

Picnic: 20% of the people will eat 80% of the food!

People: 20% of the people will be responsible for 80% of the success

Take an End of Day Assessment
At the end of the day, take a tally of how the day went and how your time was allocated. Consider tracking this in your calendar. At month’s end, look for the themes that happen time and again and consider how you can make improvements. Ask yourself:

– How much of myday was spent on proactive items versus. reactive tasks?
– When did Iwork on the most challenging tasks of the day, morning, afternoon or evening?  Did I complete it?
– What time of day did I do my reactive tasks?
– How much of my day was centered around proactive tasks?

The Most Common Interview Questions

MOST COMMON INTERVIEW QUESTIONS

For some, the most nerve-wracking part of a hiring process is the interview. But, it doesn’t have to be if you’ve taken time to practice your answers and delivery. Glassdoor.com has published an extensive list of some of the most common interview questions job seekers should prepare to answer when the critical time comes. here are seven of the most common questions, plus suggested ways to respond:

1. What are your strengths? Some job seekers struggle with this because they’re concerned with appearing conceited or overly confident. The interviewer most likely is aware of your strengths already, or you wouldn’t have been invited to the interview in the first place. They are simply hoping to hear you verbalize them. Keep your answer apropos to the position for which you are interviewing. Your ability to bench press 300lbs. will have little impact on your duties as the new accounting clerk…don’t you think? 😉

2. What are your weaknesses? Companies have several reasons for asking this question, and often, experts suggest you  answer with prior weakness, and the steps you already have taken to convert it to a strength. You may also consider the some companies want to gain insight into area where additional training may be necessary when you become a part of the team. Being honest with yourself and the interviewer here will ensure that you don’t wind up being placed on assignments you’re not prepared to handle. The last thing anyone wants is for those weaknesses to be exposed at an inopportune time, wreaking havoc on the company’s goals and your career.

3. Why do you want to leave your current company? Be warned, they are not asking you to bash your boss for being an old so-and-so. Doing so will only make you look petty, and your character will definitely  come into question. Instead, look for ways to compliment your current employer for the opportunities provided to you, and use positive language to express your desire to make a change. Have you accomplished all you had hoped to with your current employer? is the opportunity for advancement limited or nonexistent? Do you simply want to reduce your commute time? People leave their jobs every day for a myriad of reasons, so find the one that truly answers this question for your situation without bad-mouthing your current employer or company.

4. Why are you interested in working for (the company interviewing you)? Almost every company, regardless of size, has a Web presence now. So answering this questions is just a matter of doing a little research beforehand. Find two or three things that impress you about your prospective employers and be prepared to express those thoughts in a matter of fact way. This is a great way to prove your interest and it lets employers know that your desire to become a member of the team isn’t only about the paycheck.

5. Where do you see yourself in five years? Ten years? A prospective employer wants to be assured that they are talking to a rational personality who has set reasonable goals for themselves. y now, you should have developed certain expectations for your career path, and those expectations can be invaluable to a company know that you will work harder, with the idea that doing so improves your chances of getting ahead more so than for someone who has no future plans whatsoever.  

6. What questions do you have for me? Can you tell me why this position is open? What do you value most in the ideal candidate for this position? Is your industry/business growing? What do you attribute to the success of your business? These questions are a great way to show the interviewer you’ve done your homework and care about something other than vacation days and medical benefits. Take notes as the interviewer answers your questions, to show that you’re listening and genuinely care about responses.

The answers given maybe also help you to decide if you are truly interested in pursuing employment with this company. No one wants to start a job only to find out the position was open because of unreasonable expectations being placed on the employees who held this position prior.

7. Why should we hire you? This questions creates a great opportunity for you to reiterate your value proposition. If this company didn’t already see reasons to hire you, you wouldn’t have received an interview. Re-establish those reasons by being prepared to expand on information they already have in your resume and bring focus to those times where your involvement proved beneficial. Additionally, you may point out an area of “pain” you happen to kn ow this company is experiencing and then offer your ideas for a solution.

Nothing says, “I’m prepared,” like being prepared. You can’t know every questions an interviewer may ask. However, being familiar wit common questions, like the seven above, and being ready with a response will give you a leg up on the competition.

Most Common Interview Questions

For some, the most nerve-wracking part of a hiring process is the interview. But, it doesn’t have to be if you’ve taken time to practice your answers and delivery. Glassdoor.com has published an extensive list of some of the most common interview questions job seekers should prepare to answer when the critical time comes. here are seven of the most common questions, plus suggested ways to respond:

1. What are your strengths? Some job seekers struggle with this because they’re concerned with appearing conceited or overly confident. The interviewer most likely is aware of your strengths already, or you wouldn’t have been invited to the interview in the first place. They are simply hoping to hear you verbalize them. Keep your answer apropos to the position for which you are interviewing. Your ability to bench press 300lbs. will have little impact on your duties as the new accounting clerk…don’t you think? 😉

2. What are your weaknesses? Companies have several reasons for asking this question, and often, experts suggest you  answer with prior weakness, and the steps you already have taken to convert it to a strength. You may also consider the some companies want to gain insight into area where additional training may be necessary when you become a part of the team. Being honest with yourself and the interviewer here will ensure that you don’t wind up being placed on assignments you’re not prepared to handle. The last thing anyone wants is for those weaknesses to be exposed at an inopportune time, wreaking havoc on the company’s goals and your career.

3. Why do you want to leave your current company? Be warned, they are not asking you to bash your boss for being an old so-and-so. Doing so will only make you look petty, and your character will definitely  come into question. Instead, look for ways to compliment your current employer for the opportunities provided to you, and use positive language to express your desire to make a change. Have you accomplished all you had hoped to with your current employer? is the opportunity for advancement limited or nonexistent? Do you simply want to reduce your commute time? People leave their jobs every day for a myriad of reasons, so find the one that truly answers this question for your situation without bad-mouthing your current employer or company.

4. Why are you interested in working for (the company interviewing you)? Almost every company, regardless of size, has a Web presence now. So answering this questions is just a matter of doing a little research beforehand. Find two or three things that impress you about your prospective employers and be prepared to express those thoughts in a matter of fact way. This is a great way to prove your interest and it lets employers know that your desire to become a member of the team isn’t only about the paycheck.

5. Where do you see yourself in five years? Ten years? A prospective employer wants to be assured that they are talking to a rational personality who has set reasonable goals for themselves. y now, you should have developed certain expectations for your career path, and those expectations can be invaluable to a company know that you will work harder, with the idea that doing so improves your chances of getting ahead more so than for someone who has no future plans whatsoever.  

6. What questions do you have for me? Can you tell me why this position is open? What do you value most in the ideal candidate for this position? Is your industry/business growing? What do you attribute to the success of your business? These questions are a great way to show the interviewer you’ve done your homework and care about something other than vacation days and medical benefits. Take notes as the interviewer answers your questions, to show that you’re listening and genuinely care about responses.

The answers given maybe also help you to decide if you are truly interested in pursuing employment with this company. No one wants to start a job only to find out the position was open because of unreasonable expectations being placed on the employees who held this position prior.

7. Why should we hire you? This questions creates a great opportunity for you to reiterate your value proposition. If this company didn’t already see reasons to hire you, you wouldn’t have received an interview. Re-establish those reasons by being prepared to expand on information they already have in your resume and bring focus to those times where your involvement proved beneficial. Additionally, you may point out an area of “pain” you happen to kn ow this company is experiencing and then offer your ideas for a solution.

Nothing says, “I’m prepared,” like being prepared. You can’t know every questions an interviewer may ask. However, being familiar wit common questions, like the seven above, and being ready with a response will give you a leg up on the competition.

Most Common Interview Questions

For some, the most nerve-wracking part of a hiring process is the interview. But, it doesn’t have to be if you’ve taken time to practice your answers and delivery. Glassdoor.com has published an extensive list of some of the most common interview questions job seekers should prepare to answer when the critical time comes. here are seven of the most common questions, plus suggested ways to respond:

1. What are your strengths? Some job seekers struggle with this because they’re concerned with appearing conceited or overly confident. The interviewer most likely is aware of your strengths already, or you wouldn’t have been invited to the interview in the first place. They are simply hoping to hear you verbalize them. Keep your answer apropos to the position for which you are interviewing. Your ability to bench press 300lbs. will have little impact on your duties as the new accounting clerk…don’t you think? 😉

2. What are your weaknesses? Companies have several reasons for asking this question, and often, experts suggest you  answer with prior weakness, and the steps you already have taken to convert it to a strength. You may also consider the some companies want to gain insight into area where additional training may be necessary when you become a part of the team. Being honest with yourself and the interviewer here will ensure that you don’t wind up being placed on assignments you’re not prepared to handle. The last thing anyone wants is for those weaknesses to be exposed at an inopportune time, wreaking havoc on the company’s goals and your career.

3. Why do you want to leave your current company? Be warned, they are not asking you to bash your boss for being an old so-and-so. Doing so will only make you look petty, and your character will definitely  come into question. Instead, look for ways to compliment your current employer for the opportunities provided to you, and use positive language to express your desire to make a change. Have you accomplished all you had hoped to with your current employer? is the opportunity for advancement limited or nonexistent? Do you simply want to reduce your commute time? People leave their jobs every day for a myriad of reasons, so find the one that truly answers this question for your situation without bad-mouthing your current employer or company.

4. Why are you interested in working for (the company interviewing you)? Almost every company, regardless of size, has a Web presence now. So answering this questions is just a matter of doing a little research beforehand. Find two or three things that impress you about your prospective employers and be prepared to express those thoughts in a matter of fact way. This is a great way to prove your interest and it lets employers know that your desire to become a member of the team isn’t only about the paycheck.

5. Where do you see yourself in five years? Ten years? A prospective employer wants to be assured that they are talking to a rational personality who has set reasonable goals for themselves. y now, you should have developed certain expectations for your career path, and those expectations can be invaluable to a company know that you will work harder, with the idea that doing so improves your chances of getting ahead more so than for someone who has no future plans whatsoever.  

6. What questions do you have for me? Can you tell me why this position is open? What do you value most in the ideal candidate for this position? Is your industry/business growing? What do you attribute to the success of your business? These questions are a great way to show the interviewer you’ve done your homework and care about something other than vacation days and medical benefits. Take notes as the interviewer answers your questions, to show that you’re listening and genuinely care about responses.

The answers given maybe also help you to decide if you are truly interested in pursuing employment with this company. No one wants to start a job only to find out the position was open because of unreasonable expectations being placed on the employees who held this position prior.

7. Why should we hire you? This questions creates a great opportunity for you to reiterate your value proposition. If this company didn’t already see reasons to hire you, you wouldn’t have received an interview. Re-establish those reasons by being prepared to expand on information they already have in your resume and bring focus to those times where your involvement proved beneficial. Additionally, you may point out an area of “pain” you happen to kn ow this company is experiencing and then offer your ideas for a solution.

Nothing says, “I’m prepared,” like being prepared. You can’t know every questions an interviewer may ask. However, being familiar wit common questions, like the seven above, and being ready with a response will give you a leg up on the competition.

Interview Preparation Questions

Here are some helpful interview questions to review before your interview. Create a unique response for each one. Always being prepared before an interview is most important.

1. Tell me about your greatest accomplishment on the job.

2.Tell me about a difficult situation you encountered at work and how you overcame it.

3. Give me three adjectives you would use to describe yourself and examples of you work style to support them.

4. Give me three adjectives you would use to describe your weaknesses/areas for improvement and the reasons why you feel you need to work on these.

5. If I was to ask a co-worker about you, how would they describe you on-the-job?

6. Tell me about a time where you were required wot work with a difficult person (i.e. client, coworker, manager, etc.). How did you handle the situation? What was the outcome?
7. If you were given a task to complete in an unrealistic time frame, what would you do?

8. If someone came to you with an enthusiastic, yet unrealistic request, how would you handle it?

9. Why are you looking to leave your current position?

10. What do you wan to get out of your next job?

11. Tell me about the best manager you ever had? Now tell me about the worst?

12. What are the three most valuable things you’ve learned while working in your current position?

13. What was the biggest mistake you’ve made on a job? How did you handle the failure?

14. What do you feel makes you successful in your current role? Give an example to support your success?

15. What do you think makes a company good to work for? What do you like about your current company? What could be better?

16. Do you prefer working alone or in teams? Give examples of how you have worked successfully both alone and in a team? what do you attribute your success to?

17. What are your own business philosophies – What do you feel must be present in a successful business?

18. What skills are you looking to develop in your next job? Why?

You should always have questions to ask-rewrite the questions in your own words…this way you can ask them in your interviews.

You want to Connect – Learn – Ask and Close

1. How did you join the company?

2. What has this company taught you?

3. What makes the department I’d work in successful?

4. I’ve done my research on the company, but I’d love to hear you describe the corporate culture here in your own words.

5. What makes this a great place to work? And since no company is perfect, what could be improved upon?

6. What traits do you feel a person needs in order to be successful at this company?

7. Can you give me an example of a recent hire that has been successful?

8. What are the three greatest strengths of this company? What are the three greatest strengths of the department I’d be working in?

9. If I could change add/change anything about myself and my experience to make me a better fit for the position and the company, what would it be?

10. What are the next steps in the hiring process?

When closing regardless of your style and how you choose to close the interview, there are some key points to keep in mind:

1. Leave your interviewer with the right picture of you. think of at least five skills or traits you want remembered after the interview.

2. Ask if there is anything else you can provide, such as references, background information or work samples.

3. State your interest in the position. Don’t be overly anxious, but act interested. Remember to mention the added value you can bring to the job.

4. Ask about the next step in the process. It’s important for you to know the next step so you can follow-up. Ask for the decision date.

5. Find out how to contact them. If you don’t hear back, you will need to know who to contact and whether they will accept calls to check the status.

Determine which closing is best for you and the situation at hand. 🙂 

 

 

 

 

 

20 Things 20 year olds don’t do

Every Friday TTS has an office meeting. They usually consist of  some motivational tips for the sales team, staff expectations and goals. We also review our weekly struggles and help each other by giving helpful tips on how to pull through those tough moments when we feel we just “CAN’T ANYMORE!”.

Last weeks meeting stood out to me because of the valuable information that was provided to us – SOOOOOO valuable that I wanted to share it with all of you!

An inspirational article was presented to the staff by our CEO. During the meeting we were able to pick it apart and see what applies to our candidates and clients. After doing so – we compared ourselves to this article and realized this does not only applies to what WE look for in our candidates BUT whats expected of us as employees too.

Whether your’e 20 and just starting off OR older and think you have ALL the experience in the world – doesn’t matter –> Check it out! 🙂

1.Time is Not a Limitless Commodity – I so rarely find young professionals that have a heightened sense of urgency to get to the next level.  In our 20s we think we have all the time in the world to A) figure it out and B) get what we want.  Time is the only treasure we start off with in abundance, and can never get back.  Make the most of the opportunities you have today, because there will be a time when you have no more of it.

2.You’re Talented, But Talent is Overrated – Congratulations, you may be the most capable, creative, knowledgeable & multi-tasking generation yet.  As my father says, “I’ll Give You a Sh-t Medal.”  Unrefined raw materials (no matter how valuable) are simply wasted potential.  There’s no prize for talent, just results.  Even the most seemingly gifted folks methodically and painfully worked their way to success.  (Tip: read “Talent is Overrated”)

3.We’re More Productive in the Morning – During my first 2 years at Docstoc (while I was still in my 20’s) I prided myself on staying at the office until 3am on a regular basis.  I thought I got so much work done in those hours long after everyone else was gone.  But in retrospect I got more menial, task-based items done, not the more complicated strategic planning, phone calls or meetings that needed to happen during business hours.  Now I stress an office-wide early start time because I know, for the most part, we’re more productive as a team in those early hours of the day.

4.Social Media is Not a Career – These job titles won’t exist in 5 years. Social media is simply a function of marketing; it helps support branding, ROI or both.  Social media is a means to get more awareness, more users or more revenue.  It’s not an end in itself.  I’d strongly caution against pegging your career trajectory solely to a social media job title.

5.Pick Up the Phone – Stop hiding behind your computer. Business gets done on the phone and in person.  It should be your first instinct, not last, to talk to a real person and source business opportunities.  And when the Internet goes down… stop looking so befuddled and don’t ask to go home.  Don’t be a pansy, pick up the phone.

6.Be the First In & Last to Leave ­– I give this advice to everyone starting a new job or still in the formative stages of their professional career.  You have more ground to make up than everyone else around you, and you do have something to prove.  There’s only one sure-fire way to get ahead, and that’s to work harder than all of your peers.

7.Don’t Wait to Be Told What to Do – You can’t have a sense of entitlement without a sense of responsibility.  You’ll never get ahead by waiting for someone to tell you what to do.  Saying “nobody asked me to do this” is a guaranteed recipe for failure.  Err on the side of doing too much, not too little.

8.Take Responsibility for Your Mistakes – You should be making lots of mistakes when you’re early on in your career.  But you shouldn’t be defensive about errors in judgment or execution.  Stop trying to justify your F-ups.  You’re only going to grow by embracing the lessons learned from your mistakes, and committing to learn from those experiences.

9.You Should Be Getting Your Butt Kicked – Meryl Streep in “The Devil Wears Prada” would be the most valuable boss you could possibly have.  This is the most impressionable, malleable and formative stage of your professional career.  Working for someone that demands excellence and pushes your limits every day will build the most solid foundation for your ongoing professional success.

10.A New Job a Year Isn’t a Good Thing ­­– 1-year stints don’t tell me that you’re so talented that you keep outgrowing your company.  It tells me that you don’t have the discipline to see your own learning curve through to completion.  It takes about 2-3 years to master any new critical skill, give yourself at least that much time before you jump ship.  Otherwise your resume reads as a series of red flags on why not to be hired.

11.People Matter More Than Perks – It’s so trendy to pick the company that offers the most flex time, unlimited meals, company massages, game rooms and team outings.  Those should all matter, but not as much as the character of your founders and managers. Great leaders will mentor you and will be a loyal source of employment long after you’ve left.  Make a conscious bet on the folks you’re going to work for and your commitment to them will pay off much more than those fluffy perks.

12.Map Effort to Your Professional Gain – You’re going to be asked to do things you don’t like to do.  Keep your eye on the prize.   Connect what you’re doing today, with where you want to be tomorrow.  That should be all the incentive you need. If you can’t map your future success to your current responsibilities, then it’s time to find a new opportunity. (See: How To Know When It’s Time To Quit)

13.Speak Up, Not Out – We’re raising a generation of sh-t talkers.  In your workplace this is a cancer.  If you have issues with management, culture or your role & responsibilities, SPEAK UP.  Don’t take those complaints and trash-talk the company or co-workers on lunch breaks and anonymous chat boards.  If you can effectively communicate what needs to be improved, you have the ability to shape your surroundings and professional destiny.

14.You HAVE to Build Your Technical Chops – Adding “Proficient in Microsoft Office” at the bottom of your resume under Skills, is not going to cut it anymore.  I immediately give preference to candidates who are ninjas in: Photoshop, HTML/CSS, iOS, WordPress, Adwords, MySQL, Balsamiq, advanced Excel, Final Cut Pro – regardless of their job position.  If you plan to stay gainfully employed, you better complement that humanities degree with some applicable technical chops.

15.Both the Size and Quality of Your Network Matter – It’s who you know more than what you know, that gets you ahead in business.  Knowing a small group of folks very well, or a huge smattering of contacts superficially, just won’t cut it.  Meet and stay connected to lots of folks, and invest your time developing as many of those relationships as possible. (TIP: Here is myNetworking Advice)

16..You Need At Least 3 Professional Mentors – The most guaranteed path to success is to emulate those who’ve achieved what you seek.  You should always have at least 3 people you call mentors who are where you want to be.  Their free guidance and counsel will be the most priceless gift you can receive.  (TIP:  “The Secret to Finding and Keeping Mentors”)

17.Pick an Idol & Act “As If” – You may not know what to do, but your professional idol does.  I often coach my employees to pick the businessperson they most admire, and act “as if.”  If you were (fill in the blank) how would he or she carry themselves, make decisions, organize his/her day, accomplish goals?  You’ve got to fake it until you make it, so it’s better to fake it as the most accomplished person you could imagine.   (Shout out to Tony Robbins for the tip)

18.Read More Books, Fewer Tweets/Texts – Your generation consumes information in headlines and 140 characters:  all breadth and no depth.  Creativity, thoughtfulness and thinking skills are freed when you’re forced to read a full book cover to cover.  All the keys to your future success, lay in the past experience of others.  Make sure to read a book a month  (fiction or non-fiction) and your career will blossom.

19.Spend 25% Less Than You Make – When your material needs meet or exceed your income, you’re sabotaging your ability to really make it big.  Don’t shackle yourself with golden handcuffs (a fancy car or an expensive apartment).  Be willing and able to take 20% less in the short term, if it could mean 200% more earning potential.  You’re nothing more than penny wise and pound-foolish if you pass up an amazing new career opportunity to keep an extra little bit of income.  No matter how much money you make, spend 25% less to support your life.  It’s a guaranteed formula to be less stressed and to always have the flexibility to pursue your dreams.

20. Your Reputation is Priceless, Don’t Damage It – Over time, your reputation is the most valuable currency you have in business.  It’s the invisible key that either opens or closes doors of professional opportunity.  Especially in an age where everything is forever recorded and accessible, your reputation has to be guarded like the most sacred treasure.  It’s the one item that, once lost, you can never get back.

***Pass it on. Make yourself more valuable than you already are!***